University of Southern California

McMahon Lab

USC Stem Cell

Sanjeev Kumar describes how Sox9 kicks injured kidney cells into reparative mode

Activation of Sox9 (green) in nuclei (blue) of cellular lining (yellow) following acute nephron injury. Surviving SOX9+ cells proliferate (red) to repair the damaged nephron, restoring kidney function. (Image courtesy of the McMahon Lab )

Activation of Sox9 (green) in nuclei (blue) of proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs, yellow) following acute nephron injury. Surviving SOX9+ cells proliferate (red) to repair the damaged nephron, restoring renal function. (Image courtesy of the McMahon Lab )

In the kidney, injured cells can be kicked into reparative mode by a gene called Sox9, according to a new paper published in Cell Reports.

First author Sanjeev Kumar, a postdoctoral research associate in the USC Stem Cell laboratory of Andy McMahon, found that surviving injured cells switch on the Sox9 gene as a response to kidney damage. This regenerates the injured cellular lining of the nephron, the functional unit of the kidney, and repairs the kidney after acute kidney injury (AKI).

To read more, visit stemcell.usc.edu/2015/09/15/3641.

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